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Smoking's Effect on Brain & Overall Health Risks


General Knowledge  •  14 Dec, 2023  •  19,850 Views  •  ⭐ 2.5

Written by Shivani Chourasia


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The habit of smoking, long known for its devastating impact on lungs and heart health, has now been linked to a significant smoking impact on brain health, according to recent research. This blog delves into the alarming findings about the impact of smoking on mental health, including irreversible brain shrinkage, and provides insights into effective strategies for how to stop smoking naturally.

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The Inescapable Damage: Smoking and Brain Shrinkage

Image Credits: AIHMS
Image Credits: AIHMS

Recent studies at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have brought to light the shocking impact of smoke on human health, particularly concerning the brain. It's been discovered that smoking not only causes irreversible brain shrinkage but also accelerates ageing within the brain. This shrinking is a direct result of tobacco use and contributes to a heightened risk of cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. Notably, this damage persists even after quitting, underscoring the severity of the side effects of smoking.

Genetic Factors and Smoking: A Vicious Cycle

Image Credits: Cadabams
Image Credits: Cadabams

The research further explores how genetic predisposition intertwines with smoking habits, exacerbating the smoking impact on brain health. Individuals with a genetic inclination towards smoking are more likely to experience reduced brain volume, illustrating a complex relationship between genetics, behaviour, and brain health. This highlights the importance of understanding personal health risks and taking proactive steps in smoking cessation.

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Prevention and Cessation: Key to Mitigating Brain Health Risks

Image Credits: Brainz Magazine
Image Credits: Brainz Magazine

Acknowledging the irreversible nature of brain damage caused by smoking, the studies emphasize the urgency of quitting smoking to prevent further deterioration. The act of quitting can halt the progression of brain shrinkage, albeit not reversing the damage already done. This finding is crucial, particularly for older adults, as both smoking and ageing are prominent risk factors for dementia.

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