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Common English Phrases: Right vs. Wrong


English Grammar  •  8 Jan, 2024  •  30,956 Views  •  ⭐ 2.3

Written by Shivani Chourasia


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In the vast and ever-evolving landscape of the English language, it's not uncommon to stumble upon phrases that are frequently misused or misunderstood. Even seasoned speakers can find themselves tangled in the intricacies of idiomatic expressions. This blog aims to shed light on some everyday English phrases that are often said incorrectly, offering clarity and guidance for more accurate usage.

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“For all intensive purposes” vs. “For all intents and purposes”

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The phrase “for all intents and purposes” means in every practical sense. Its commonly misheard version, “for all intensive purposes,” although widespread, is incorrect. This phrase is a prime example of how easily spoken language can morph into new, unintended forms.

“One in the same” vs. “One and the same”

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The correct expression is “one and the same,” denoting that two things are identical. “One in the same” is a phonetic misinterpretation, showing how easily our ears can deceive our understanding.

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“Nip it in the butt” vs. “Nip it in the bud”

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“Nip it in the bud,” the correct phrase, refers to stopping something at an early stage before it develops further. The incorrect “nip it in the butt” is a humorous, if not slightly awkward, reinterpretation.

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